Kamut Rolls for WonderMill Challenge

I haven’t been on my blog for a while, we moved to a new house earlier this year and I am just getting back into blogging again. A friend of mine told me that WonderMill is starting to have a regular WonderMill Blogger Challenge and so I thought I would participate to help me expand my uses of grains on my blog. The current challenge is to make Homemade Rolls using flour made in the WonderMill or Wonder Junior grain mill. I also entered this into the Bake-Your-Own-Bread event and Nomday Monday recipe link up.

I have a Wonder Junior Deluxe grain mill that grinds up a nice flour from Kamut grain. I really like the taste of Kamut flour when it is added to bread, rolls, tortillas, and pitas. So I thought I would use Kamut for WonderMill’s Homemade Rolls Challenge. These Buttermilk Rolls came out wonderful, as you can see from the photo above.

The addition of Kamut flour gave them almost a buttery taste without adding butter. You wouldn’t want to make the rolls with Kamut flour only or they will come out dense, in my experience. I subbed just less than half of the all-purpose white flour out for Kamut flour and they still came out nice and fluffy. The original recipe is from the Taste of Home website and I made some slight changes.

Kamut Buttermilk Rolls
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
This Buttermilk Kamut Rolls recipe makes 24 rolls but it can easily be cut in half if needed.
Author:
Recipe type: Appetiser
Ingredients
  • 4½ teaspoons yeast
  • 3½ cups warm water
  • 12 tablespoons (or ¾ cup) buttermilk powder
  • 1 cup canola oil
  • 6 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 4 cups Kamut flour (freshly milled prefered)
  • 5 cups all-purpose flour
Instructions
  1. In your mixer bowl, add yeast, sugar, water, buttermilk powder, and Kamut flour. Then turn on the mixer for about 10-20 seconds. Let this sit for about 1 minute to let the yeast get started.
  2. Add oil, salt, and baking soda. Turn on the mixer and then start adding all-purpose flour 1 cup at a time till all flour has been added, allowing it to mix in before adding the next cup. Dough will be a bit stickier and wetter than bread dough.
  3. Let the mixer mix on medium speed for 8 minutes.
  4. Transfer the dough to a very large greased bowl. spray the top of the dough with oil. Loosely cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rise till it has doubled, this usually takes mine about 1 hour 15 minutes.
  5. Punch dough down and divide dough into 24 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a ball and place it into a greased baking pan (I use 2 casserole pans or 3 round cake pans, both fit in the oven all at once). Spray the top of the dough balls with oil and cover loosely with plastic wrap. Let rise until doubled, about 30 minutes.
  6. Bake at 400° for 16-20 minutes, until golden brown, and remove from oven.
  7. Turn rolls out on a cooking rack.
  8. With a stick of butter, lightly rub butter on the top of rolls for a wonderful butter-top taste (optional).
  9. Let them cool down completely, about 45+ minutes.

 

These rolls are very cheap to make and they taste so good because they are homemade. The only ingredient that really cost much is the buttermilk powder. They are still way cheaper that buying rolls from the bakery, and healthier because of the addition of whole grain Kamut flour. I hope to devote an entire post to Kamut in the future to give you some more information about this ancient grain, hopefully soon.

Below is a picture of my little helper who is always pulling a chair up to the counter and trying to help me prepare food, so totally cute but not very helpful yet. They got to start somewhere, hopefully she is still interested when she gets a little older.

3 thoughts on “Kamut Rolls for WonderMill Challenge

  1. Jamie

    Beautiful! And what a sweet little helper you have!

    KAMUT® Brand khorasan is an organic, non-genetically modified, ancient wheat variety similar to durum. In 1990, “KAMUT” was registered as a trademark by the Quinn family in order to support organic farming and preserve the ancient khorsasan wheat variety. Under the KAMUT® Brand name, khorasan wheat must always be grown organically, never be hybridized or modified, and contain high levels of purity and nutrition. Today, Kamut International owns and has registered the KAMUT® trademark in over 40 countries, and is responsible for protection and marketing of all KAMUT® Brand khorasan wheat throughout the world.

    KAMUT® khorasan is grown on dryland certified organic farms primarily in Montana, Alberta, and Saskatchewan. The grain is prized by consumers who appreciate the grain for its high energy nutrition, easy digestibility, nutty/buttery taste, and firm texture.

    KAMUT® khorasan wheat is higher in protein, selenium, amino acids, and Vitamin E than most modern wheat and contains essential minerals such as magnesium and zinc. It is used as whole grain berries, whole grain flour, white flour, flakes, and puffs to make a variety of products. Some specific benefits of using KAMUT® khorasan are receiving more nutrients, protein, and taste than conventional whole wheat – plus supporting organic agriculture and helping to preserve an ancient grain.

    KAMUT® khorasan is a variety of wheat thus has gluten content. A lot of people who are not able to tolerate wheat tell us that they are able to tolerate KAMUT® khorasan wheat. KI has ongoing research to understand why – it is our theory that because KAMUT® khorasan is an ancient grain, it has not had the good benefits bred out of it like modern wheat.

    For more information, including recipes, please visit our website – http://www.kamut.com

    My kind regards – Jamie

    Jamie Ryan Lockman | Regional Director – North America
    Kamut International, Ltd.
    P.O. Box 4903 | Missoula, MT 59806 | USA
    406.251.9418 phone | 406.251.9420 fax
    jamie.lockman@kamut.com | http://www.kamut.com

    Reply

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