Tag Archives: oats

Make Rolled Oats & Flaked Grains

Make Rolled Oats & Flaked Grains

Have you ever bought rolled oats from the store and they had very little taste or a bitter taste? They lack taste because they have either been over processed or sat on the shelf for way to long. They may also become slightly rancid when they have been sitting way to long. These store bought rolled oats or flaked grains are also often void of most of their nutrition.

I love fresh rolled oats and other grains. They are full of wonderful flavor and packed with whole grain nutrition, say goodbye to the blah store bought rolled oats and flaked grains by making them fresh in your kitchen.

I have been rolling my own oats and flaking grains for about 8 years now and have learned that TWO simple things that make it MUCH BETTER.

Tip #1 Prep The Grains

When I first started I just poured the grains in the grain flaker mill and got brittle flaked oats. This worked alright but it was not what I really wanted, I wanted nice whole flaked grains that held together for use in breakfast cereals, deserts, breads, and so on… I did not want crumbs of flaked grains that easily fell apart.

To overcome this I found you need to pre-soak the grains with a little bit of water first, then the result will be real flaked grains and not flaked crumbs (see photo below to see the difference). The pre-soak with very little water makes the grain just soft enough for an effective flattening process that holds together.

Here is the Steps for Prepping Your Grains:

  1. Put 2 cups of grains or oat groats (or mixture of grains) in a seal-able container.
  2. Add 2-3 teaspoons of cold water (I use 3).
  3. Seal the container and shake vigorously for 15 seconds to spread the water around to all the grains.
  4. Let sit for 1 minute or so and shake again.
  5. Let the sealed container sit overnight, at least 8 hours or more.
  6. Now the grains are ready to be flaked.

This is probably the most important part of flaking your own grains. Not many people think to do it but it makes all the difference in grain flaking. Most commercial companies steam their oats before rolling them flat for best results.

Tip #2 The Right Grain Flaker Mill

The FGM Grain Flaker (by Family Grain Mill)
I have tried many grain flakers, expensive and cheap, and have settled on the FGM (Family Grain Mill) Grain Flaker (made in Germany). What I like most about this unit is it uses a rough roller to pull the grains through but the other side is a curved shaped flat surface (see photo to the right) that helps keep the grain from getting crushed to much so your end product is better. All of the other grain flakers use two rough rollers and do not provide as good of an end product as the FGM Grain Flaker.

 

Another thing I like about the FGM Grain Flaker mill is that it can be used as a kitchen mixer attachment for many brands of kitchen mixers (some require an additional attachment part) or it can be used as a hand cranked stand alone unit. I use it both ways. It fits directly on to my WonderMix Revolution Kitchen Mixer so I can roll oats and grains with no effort or when I want to be quiet I put it on the hand crank base which turns effortless to produced flaked grains (my kids like to do it this way). This hand crank base for the Family Grain Mill products is also great for preppers / off grid minded people and they have several other attachments.

(Family Grain Mill attachments can fit many different brands of mixers and even a hand base)

How it works
Just pour the grains (preferably prepped as mentioned above) into the grain flaker’s hopper and start cranking the handle and the grains come out flatted, it is as simple as that.

Storing Freshly Flaked Grains

I have found that freshly flaked grains keep most of their flavor (and probably their nutrition) for at least a month in a sealed container at room temperature. I would not store them for more than 3 months, if used with-in 3 months you will always get a better tasting product and more nutrition than any of the store bought brands or bulk bins.

You can also put the sealed container of flaked grains in the freezer to keep them fresh and preserved for even longer.

The Grains

The nice thing about whole grains is that they stay good for years and years. I buy grains in bulk and flake them or grind them into flour when I need them. I also pressure cooker the whole grains to add to recipes for a healthy filling accent to some foods. There are many grains that are gluten-free that you can flake, grind or use whole if that is needed in your diet like my wife does.

Grains I Flake
Oat Groats (whole oats), KAMUT, and Quinoa are the main grains I flake for cereals, deserts, and for adding to breads. You can also flake wheat, spelt, buckwheat, and many other grains. Some grains are too brittle such as einkorn for flaking at home.

Mix It Up
Most people just flake one kid of grain at a time, I find it best to flake a mixture of grains together. Each grain has its own certain health benefits that are sometimes more abundant in some grains than in others, for this reason I like to mix about 3 grains together to get the health benefits from all three grains in one meal.

My favorite grain mixture is 1 cup oat groats, 1/2 cup quiona, and 1/2 cup Kamut. you simply mix all the grains together before doing your pre-soak and running them through the grain flaker mill.

What Do You Do With Flaked Grains?

You can do many things with flaked grains, here are a few ideas:

  • Overnight Oats
  • Hot Cereal
  • Add to breads
  • Add to deserts and cookies
  • Granola mix or bars
  • Use in meatloaf
  • Risotto
  • Breakfast bars or power bars
  • Add to muffins
  • Add to casseroles
  • Add to soups
  • Apple Crumble

Overnight Oats My Favorite

My favorite thing to do with flaked grains and oats is overnight oats. There are hundreds of different recipes out there for overnight oats, which is great because if you do it the same all the time it get a bit blah so try lots of them and decide on a handful you like best. There are many reasons to do it, here is a few great articles:

What do you use rolled oats and flaked grains for?
Let us know in the comments section below.

Oat Flour Pancakes (Old-Fashioned & Gluten-Free)

Oat Flour Pancakes

I have about 40 pounds oat groats in my food storage right now that I need to start implementing more in my recipes because I want to eat what I store. I’ve used oats in the past by rolling oat groats into rolled oats with my friends Marga Oat Roller, I have also used oat flour sparingly in a few recipes. I decided to try something with all oat flour and my little girl has been a pancake eating monster lately so here goes another pancake recipe.

To make oat flour it is best to use a grain mill and grind it from oat groats or steel cut oats, rolled oats from the store have usually lost much nutritional value and they tend to get stuck going into electric grain mills. I like to grind my oats on a setting just between Pastry and Bread on my WonderMill grain mill.

This oat pancake recipe would be great for adding fruit to or topping with a fruit compote, or just plain syrup. Oat flour pancakes are a great alternative for those of you who are gluten-intolerant and some people who need to be gluten-free. I have heard some people that many people who have celiac disease can sometimes have issues with oats also. Those with celiac will also want to make sure that there oats are certified gluten-free as some oats are harvested with the same equipment that harvests wheat.

4.9 from 42 reviews
Oat Flour Pancakes (Old-Fashioned Style)
 
makes about 12 pancakes at the ¼ cup batter size.
Author:
Ingredients
  • 1¾ cup freshly ground oat flour
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1½ tablespoons canola oil
  • 2 large eggs
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla (optional)
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat electric griddle to 375 degrees..
  2. Add all dry ingredients to a mixing bowl and whisk together.
  3. Add all wet ingredients to a 2nd mixing bowl and whisk together.
  4. Add dry ingredient mix to wet ingredient mixing bowl and whisk till it just comes together.
  5. Lightly spray your hot griddle with cooking spray.
  6. Use a ¼ measuring cup to scoop the pancake batter onto the griddle.
  7. I cook my pancakes 1 minute 45 seconds on the first side and 2 minutes 15 seconds on the second side for perfect pancakes, this may vary on your griddle.

 

NOTE: if these oat pancakes come out too heavy when you make them you may have to increase the liquid OR decrease the flour next time you make them. Oat flour can vary and the oat flour I make in a quality grain mill from oat groats might be much lighter than your oat flour. Also there can be some variation from the way I measure 1 cup of flour and the way you measure 1 cup of flour.

Oat Flour Pancakes on plate

gf-pumpkin-oat-pancakes

 

if you like these pancakes, you might also like my Oat Flour Pumpkin Pancakes recipe over at WholeGrainsBaking.com blog where I am a guest blogger. The pumpkin adds some moisture to the pancakes and who doesn’t like pumpkin? No one should hate Pumpkin, it is so good.

WW Buttermilk Oat Pancakes

As you can tell from my last post, I have been into using my oat groats lately. Well not only do oats groats make great rolled oats but they also make a tasty oat flour when milled in a grain mill. Oat flour is much fluffier that any other flour I have used before in the past and it usually takes more flour in a recipe when you are using oat flour. It is good to use variety in the grains you use everyday so they don’t get blah tasting and you get the nutritional benefits that each grain offers.

When ever I use flours that have no gluten, like oat flour, I always mix it with another flour that does have gluten like whole wheat. I took the 100% Whole Wheat Buttermilk Pancake Recipe from twopeasandtheirpod.com, that I love so much, and adjusted it to have the wonderful taste of oat flour. I have adjusted the recipe several times and here is the one that gives best results.

Oat Flour Buttermilk Pancakes Recipe

(photo coming soon)

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup oat flour
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 cup + 2 tablespoons buttermilk (or 1 cup water + 4 tablespoons Saco powdered buttermilk)
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 large egg

Directions:

  1. In a mixing bowl, mix all dry ingredients.
  2. In a separate mixing bowl, mix all wet ingredients.
  3. Pour wet ingredients into dry ingredients and quickly mix.
  4. Let batter sit for about 4 – 6 minutes to thicken up.
  5. Pour 1/4 cup batter onto a pre-heated pan set at medium-low.
  6. Cook each side 45 seconds to 2 minutes. (this varies depending on your stove, pan, and so on…)

These oat flour pancakes are full of flavor that you just can’t get from any other flour but oat flour. I how you enjoy this recipe, my family does. I also always use powdered buttermilk instead of regular buttermilk because I can store it for more than 2 years and it is convenient, the brand I use is Saco Powdered Buttermilk which is found in most grocery stores.