WonderMix Kitchen Mixer Review

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The WonderMix kitchen mixer is the new kid in the market and ever since we received them in our store we have given our demo WonderMix mixer quite the workout. I have made several loaves of bread, batches of cookies, shredding meat, mashed potatoes, and plenty of other stuff. Throughout all testing, the WonderMix has proven to be a great mixer, especially for making bread.

The WonderMix seemed to mix 2-6 small loaves of bread dough very very well in the testing process, much of which was 100% whole wheat dough since I love to use whole grain flour made in my grain mill. My KitchenAid Pro 600 mixer struggles with larger batches of 100% whole wheat, so the WonderMix far outdoes the KitchenAid Pro 600 at that. My Bosch Universal Plus mixer can do a little bigger batch of bread dough than the WonderMix because of it’s bowl capacity but do you really need to do more than 6 loaves of bread, probably not ever unless you are baking for the whole neighborhood.

My Bosch mixer also seems to struggle with getting small batches of dough to start mixing, like 1-2 loaves of dough. The WonderMix did very well with 2 small loaves of bread dough (see video below). The WonderMix did struggle a little with a single small loaf of bread dough but with a little help at the start it finishes off very well. From my experience of working with people starting to bake bread, they tend to commonly do 2-4 loaves at a time, and this is the range where the WonderMix shines best.

The WonderMix has a Dough Divider which stays stationary while the dough hook spins around. This dough divider keeps small batches of dough from just spinning around with the dough hook and really gets things mixing fast. You can really see how well this system works in the “2 loaf” video above, it only takes it 5 minutes to fully develop the gluten. For larger batches of dough (3-7 loaves) the Dough Divider is not needed, just use the dough hook. See the video below for a demonstration of the dough hook.

The WonderMix bowl comes with a lid that keeps things from flying out while mixing and the middle opens for pouring in ingredients while mixing. This is a great feature of the WonderMix and the Bosch mixer as well but the KitchenAid mixers lack this feature and can make quite a mess with certain kitchen projects. This lid allows you to use the whole capacity of the mixing bowl without worry of making a mess.

For large batches of bread dough the WonderMix mixer seems to do better with just the dough hook and no Dough Divider. The WonderMix develops dough quite quickly with 2-4 loaves of dough but when you are making 5 or more loaves of bread dough at a time, the WonderMix can take a few minutes longer because the dough has to cycle in and out of the dough hook in the tall bowl (as shown in the extra large batch in the video below). The good thing is that the WonderMix does not seem to have a problem mixing for a longer period if needed, unlike the KitchenAid Mixer who recommends turning their mixer off to cool every 6 minutes or so.

As you can see in the video above of the WonderMix mixer mixing at full capacity with bread dough, this mixer has plenty of power to get the job done again and again. It is rated at 900 watts and it acts like it as well.

The bowl of the WonderMix mixer is not so wide as the Bosch bowl and I think that is an advantage when it comes to doing smaller batches of dough in the WonderMix. The WonderMix bowl is deep to make up for its smaller width. The KitchenAid’s bowl is large but can get messy if you try and use more than half capacity full, whereas the WonderMix and Bosch bowls have lids that allow you to use the bowls full capacity.

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The Bowl also has a great handle for holding when pouring out batter or dumping your dough out. The handle is not quite as nice as the Bosch Universal Plus mixer’s bowl handle that goes all the way around the bowl but it is still a nice handle that works well. You never know how nice it is to have a good handle on your mixer bowl until you have used one with out a good handle, trust me it is a nice feature to have.

The WonderMix’s bowl also locks into place with ease and won’t release until you push the release lever, not even if you pick up the mixer by the bowl. Bosch has a quick & easy lock & release bowl that works very well. The KitchenAid bowl’s lock and release functionality always makes me want to cuss, hopefully the kids aren’t around when it finally does.

With the WonderMix and Bosch mixers it doesn’t matter if you put dry ingredients in first or last, they will still mix the dough completely. With the KitchenAid Pro 600, the dough hook does not come as close to the bottom of the bowl and it becomes important to put the wet ingredients in first for bread dough or you will probably have dry ingredients still on the bottom of the bowl when your are done mixing.

Weight wise, the WonderMix kitchen mixer is by far the lightest, and because it has a locking bowl you can carry it by the bowl handle with ease. The WonderMix weighs 10.5 lbs and the Bosch Universal Plus weighs 12.6 lbs, not a huge difference but noticeable when carrying from counter to pantry storage. The KitchenAid Pro 600 weighs a whopping 25 POUNDS, there is a reason people leave it on their counter because it is a workout to put it away.

The FOOT PRINT of the WonderMix mixer is smaller than both the KitchenAid Pro 600 and the Bosch Universal Plus mixer. The KitchenAid is really tall, though it fits under your counter still, and is quite deep. The Bosch is slightly shorter than the WonderMix but it is wider and much deeper than the WonderMix. The WonderMix will save you a lot of room when stored away compared to most bread mixers.

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The WonderMix and Bosch mixers both have a no walking base design, if you have ever seen a Kitchenaid rock and wobble under a heavy load, then you know why this is a great feature. The Bosch even has suction cup feet to hold it in place, although I have never felt that it needed them.

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The WonderMix mixer has a few attachments available for it such as a slicer shredder, meat grinder & processor, grain & seed mill, and grain flaker. I use the slicer shredder quite often and have not used the other attachments that much. From my conversation with the company, they have plans for more in the future and I would like to see a pasta attachment option like the KitchenAid has.

The WonderMix & the Bosch mixers have a blender option as well, this is something that KitchenAid mixers lack the option to do. The blender is better performing than many of the low price blenders we commonly find in stores but I would never compare it to the high-end performance of a Blendtec or Vitamix blender.

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Conclusion:
I would highly recommend the WonderMix kitchen mixer to anyone, it does a great job and is a great value. I also really like my Bosch mixer but since the WonderMix mixer is quite comparable for nearly $100 less it is a no brainer to me recommend the WonderMix over it.

As for the KitchenAid, I just have a hard time getting excited about using it. I know it is the most popular mixer with its elegant looks and celebrity approval but it just doesn’t do it for me. I do feel like they have fixed some of their major problems they used to have years ago when they sounded like a jet plane and broke gears all the time, so don’t let those old reviews discourage you from it. If you do buy the KitchenAid Pro 600, I would get it from Amazon.com to get the free shipping on this 25 lbs mixer.

Buy a Mixer:
Buy a WonderMix Mixer
Buy a Bosch Universal Plus Mixer
Buy a KitchenAid Pro 600 Mixer

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